for forspec

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Introduced with Armed Assault version 1.00
  

Click on the images for descriptions

Introduced in

Game:
Armed Assault
Version:
1.00

Description

Description:
Creates cycle, using C like style. See example.

In Arma 3 use private keyword when defining any variables for the scope, see example 4.

Syntax

Syntax:
for forspec
Parameters:
forspec: Array
Return Value:
For Type

Examples

Example 1:
for [{_x= 1},{_x <= 10},{_x = _x + 1}] do {debugLog _x;}
Example 2:
_a = 0; for [{},{_a <= 10},{_a = _a + 1}] do {debugLog _a;};
Example 3:
for [{_a = 0; _b = 1},{_a <= 10},{_a = _a + 1; _b = _b + _b}] do {}; //_a = 11; _b = 2048;
Example 4:
// BAD CODE _i = 100; for [{_i = 0}, {_i < 5}, {_i = _i + 1}] do {}; hint str _i; // 5 // GOOD CODE (private keyword is recommended) _i = 100; for [{private _i = 0}, {_i < 5}, {_i = _i + 1}] do {}; hint str _i; // 100

Additional Information

Multiplayer:
-
See also:
Control Structuresfor dowhile

Notes

Only post proven facts here. Report bugs on the feedback tracker. Use the talk page or the forums for discussions.
Add New Note | How To

Notes

Posted on Apr 15, 2014 - 12:54
ffur2007slx2_5
  • Introduced with Arma 3 version 1.16
    Please note the difference between for forspec and for do, for forspec detects Boolean in each scope while for do doesn’t. e.g.
command Structure Summary
for forspec
 a = 0; b = true;
 for [{_i = 0},{_i < 10 && b},{_i = _i + 1}] do {
   a = a + 1; 
   if (a >= 7) then {b = false}
 }
loop can be exited via Boolean control, possible workaround can be like BIS_fnc_areEqual
for do
 a = 0;
 for "_i" from 0 to 10 do {
   a = a + 1;
   if (a >= 7) exitwith {}
 };
have to be exited via exitWith


  • Never try to tell a decimal number via binary number in a loop; otherwise the loop will be infinite:

for [{_a = 0},{_a != 1},{_a = _a + 0.1}] do {}; //an infinite loop; _a will never be 1 so the scope will always be true. Any binary number behind the decimal point is always the sum of 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 etc. so decimal number with odd denominator like 1/3 or 1/10 cannot be exactly equal to each other.

  • Avoid too large factorial multiply which may loose the leading indicator in result. And 12 is the biggest accessable factor in this example.

for [{_a = 2; _b = 1;},{_a < 100},{_a = _a + 1}] do {_b = _b * _a}; // _b = 1.#INF

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